Mortalité infantile

Sikira Fachola receives an ultrasound at a UNICEF-supported health centre for women and children in Pobé City, Plateau Department. She is pregnant with her first child.

In October 2006 in Benin, efforts to improve child health and protection continue to meet with limited success. UNICEF and other NGOs have successfully advocated for the abolition of school fees, and have increased the distribution and use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets among children. Under-five mortality rates have declined steadily, but remain high at nearly 15 per cent. Rates of malnutrition, the underlying cause of 36 per cent of all child deaths, continue to rise. Though 2006 saw the adoption of a law against child trafficking, programmes to protect minors remain critically understaffed. UNICEF is offering technical assistance for the creation of policies to identify, repatriate and support trafficked children. With the Government and other partners, UNICEF is working to scale up campaigns to increase HIV/AIDS awareness, prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV and reduce acute malnutrition in children.
Sikira Fachola receives an ultrasound at a UNICEF-supported health centre for women and children in Pobé City, Plateau Department. She is pregnant with her first child. In October 2006 in Benin, efforts to improve child health and protection continue to meet with limited success. UNICEF and other NGOs have successfully advocated for the abolition of school fees, and have increased the distribution and use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets among children. Under-five mortality rates have declined steadily, but remain high at nearly 15 per cent. Rates of malnutrition, the underlying cause of 36 per cent of all child deaths, continue to rise. Though 2006 saw the adoption of a law against child trafficking, programmes to protect minors remain critically understaffed. UNICEF is offering technical assistance for the creation of policies to identify, repatriate and support trafficked children. With the Government and other partners, UNICEF is working to scale up campaigns to increase HIV/AIDS awareness, prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV and reduce acute malnutrition in children.
05 Fév 2016

Eviter un « mal sournois qui tue »

Selon une récente étude médicale, sur les 2,6 millions de morts nés dans le monde chaque année, deux tiers se…

Niger, November 2012. Haouaou Abdou, 52 years old, sits during the Key Family Practices demonstration with her youngest son Issiakou, 8 months, and Oumiera, 4 years, in the village of Mazadou Abdou.

By Jessica Mony

In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012.

Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel.

Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six months; proper hand-washing techniques; treatment of diarrhoea; knowledge of how to seek medical care; immunisation; using mosquito nets to prevent malaria; promotion of delayed pregnancies and girls education. The results of adhering to these practices for the children of Mazadou Abdou have been significant. Moutari Louali, a community volunteer who is helping to implement the programme explains the impact. “Before the programme started, around four to five ch
Niger, November 2012. Haouaou Abdou, 52 years old, sits during the Key Family Practices demonstration with her youngest son Issiakou, 8 months, and Oumiera, 4 years, in the village of Mazadou Abdou. By Jessica Mony In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012. Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel. Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six months; proper hand-washing techniques; treatment of diarrhoea; knowledge of how to seek medical care; immunisation; using mosquito nets to prevent malaria; promotion of delayed pregnancies and girls education. The results of adhering to these practices for the children of Mazadou Abdou have been significant. Moutari Louali, a community volunteer who is helping to implement the programme explains the impact. “Before the programme started, around four to five ch
03 Fév 2016

Pneumonie: « Plus de 490 000 enfants décédés en 2015 », l’Unicef invite à l’action

Le financement, la gestion et le traitement de la pneumonie "restent faibles en Afrique subsaharienne", a précisé le document qui…

Niger, November 2012. During the community health sessions, led by volunteer health workers called 'Natural Leaders' mums in the village of Mazadou Abdou take turns to demonstrate the 'Key Family Practices' that contribute to their children's health and in this village have literally saved lives.
Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months - the very best start for a child when safe and nutritious breast mild is all that a baby needs.
Demonstrated by mother Haouaou who has seen that her child born after the programme started is much stronger that the child born before.
Here Haouaou feeds 8 month old Issiakou with 4 year old daughter Oumiera watching.

By Jessica Mony

In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012.

Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel.

Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six mont
Niger, November 2012. During the community health sessions, led by volunteer health workers called 'Natural Leaders' mums in the village of Mazadou Abdou take turns to demonstrate the 'Key Family Practices' that contribute to their children's health and in this village have literally saved lives. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months - the very best start for a child when safe and nutritious breast mild is all that a baby needs. Demonstrated by mother Haouaou who has seen that her child born after the programme started is much stronger that the child born before. Here Haouaou feeds 8 month old Issiakou with 4 year old daughter Oumiera watching. By Jessica Mony In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012. Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel. Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six mont
29 Jan 2016

Improving breastfeeding practices could save the lives of over 820 000 children a year

Series from The Lancet provides more evidence that breastfeeding is lifesaving – UNICEF Reductions in child mortality and reduced breast…

On 26 April, a health worker administers a measles vaccine to a child at the Port Bouet General Hospital in the city of Abidjan. Routine vaccination restarted today after nearly a month of cessation due to post-election violence.

By 5 May 2011 in Côte d’Ivoire, hundreds of thousands remain displaced by the violence that erupted after the 28 November 2010 presidential election. More than 320,000 people fled the country during the conflict, and many more were displaced within the country. Fighting abated after the 11 April arrest of former president Laurent Gbagbo, allowing international humanitarian operations to resume in many conflict-affected areas, and the security situation continues to improve. Still, lingering instability – including reports of increasing sexual violence and harassment by armed men – has delayed the return of many refugees and internally displaced people. Many hospitals and health facilities have been unable to operate properly, lacking essential drugs, equipment and staff, and millions lack access to sufficient food and water. On 16 April, for the first time since November, UNICEF was able to airlift 32 metric tonnes of medical, nutritional, educational, water and sanitation supplies into the country, and on 26 April, the Minister of Education ordered schools to reopen. With partners, UNICEF is also providing safe drinking water where needed; distributing fortified biscuits to children and pregnant and lactating women; screening children for malnutrition; conducting a back-to-school campaign aimed at a million children; conducting a polio vaccination campaign targeting 700,000 children; and conducting a measles vaccination campaign targeting 1.5 million children. UNICEF also continues to assist Ivorian refugees in surrounding countries. The Emergency Humanitarian Action Plan for Côte d’Ivoire and neighbouring countries requires US$160 million, only 20 per cent of which has been funded to date. UNICEF’s portion of the appeal is
On 26 April, a health worker administers a measles vaccine to a child at the Port Bouet General Hospital in the city of Abidjan. Routine vaccination restarted today after nearly a month of cessation due to post-election violence. By 5 May 2011 in Côte d’Ivoire, hundreds of thousands remain displaced by the violence that erupted after the 28 November 2010 presidential election. More than 320,000 people fled the country during the conflict, and many more were displaced within the country. Fighting abated after the 11 April arrest of former president Laurent Gbagbo, allowing international humanitarian operations to resume in many conflict-affected areas, and the security situation continues to improve. Still, lingering instability – including reports of increasing sexual violence and harassment by armed men – has delayed the return of many refugees and internally displaced people. Many hospitals and health facilities have been unable to operate properly, lacking essential drugs, equipment and staff, and millions lack access to sufficient food and water. On 16 April, for the first time since November, UNICEF was able to airlift 32 metric tonnes of medical, nutritional, educational, water and sanitation supplies into the country, and on 26 April, the Minister of Education ordered schools to reopen. With partners, UNICEF is also providing safe drinking water where needed; distributing fortified biscuits to children and pregnant and lactating women; screening children for malnutrition; conducting a back-to-school campaign aimed at a million children; conducting a polio vaccination campaign targeting 700,000 children; and conducting a measles vaccination campaign targeting 1.5 million children. UNICEF also continues to assist Ivorian refugees in surrounding countries. The Emergency Humanitarian Action Plan for Côte d’Ivoire and neighbouring countries requires US$160 million, only 20 per cent of which has been funded to date. UNICEF’s portion of the appeal is
28 Jan 2016

Rétrospective 2015 : les évènements à fort impact sur l’Afrique

La Banque mondiale (BM) a identifié une douzaine de faits et défis majeurs dont certains ont eu une implication directe sur…

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