UNICEF

A midwife uses a traditional stethoscope and the clock on her cellular phone to listen for and time a foetal heartbeat during her prenatal examination of Mariam Moutari, who is eight months pregnant, at the Bilmari health centre in the town of Mirriah in Mirriah Department in Zinder Region.

In March 2012 in Niger, under-five mortality rates remain among the highest in the world, the result of preventable or treatable conditions, including malnutrition. The country is one of eight in the Sahel region – also including Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and the northern parts of Cameroon, Nigeria and Senegal – facing a nutrition crisis that now affects over 10 million people. Unless reached with appropriate treatment and prevention programmes, more than 1 million under-five children are at risk of dying from nutrition-related illnesses. The current crisis is the result of repeated drought-related food shortages, from which people have insufficient time to recover before being again affected. In turn, these shocks are exacerbated by chronic stunting, high rates of poverty and illiteracy and inadequate social infrastructure, including for basic child and maternal care. In Niger, over 331,000 under-five children are at risk of becoming severely malnourished, while cases of moderate acute malnutrition are expected to exceed 689,000. Over 5.4 million people – some 35 per cent of the country’s population – remain food insecure. Stunting prevalence is above 50 per cent; over 62 per cent of the population lives in poverty, and the adult literacy rate is a low 20 per cent – only 12.3 per cent for women. UNICEF requires US$120 million to fund its Sahel emergency response in 2012, of which only 32 per cent has been received to date. The European Union (EU) is one of the largest international donors to UNICEF nutrition programmes in the Sahel and in other regions. In Niger, working with the Government and other partners, UNICEF is currently assisting over 37,000 u
A midwife uses a traditional stethoscope and the clock on her cellular phone to listen for and time a foetal heartbeat during her prenatal examination of Mariam Moutari, who is eight months pregnant, at the Bilmari health centre in the town of Mirriah in Mirriah Department in Zinder Region. In March 2012 in Niger, under-five mortality rates remain among the highest in the world, the result of preventable or treatable conditions, including malnutrition. The country is one of eight in the Sahel region – also including Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and the northern parts of Cameroon, Nigeria and Senegal – facing a nutrition crisis that now affects over 10 million people. Unless reached with appropriate treatment and prevention programmes, more than 1 million under-five children are at risk of dying from nutrition-related illnesses. The current crisis is the result of repeated drought-related food shortages, from which people have insufficient time to recover before being again affected. In turn, these shocks are exacerbated by chronic stunting, high rates of poverty and illiteracy and inadequate social infrastructure, including for basic child and maternal care. In Niger, over 331,000 under-five children are at risk of becoming severely malnourished, while cases of moderate acute malnutrition are expected to exceed 689,000. Over 5.4 million people – some 35 per cent of the country’s population – remain food insecure. Stunting prevalence is above 50 per cent; over 62 per cent of the population lives in poverty, and the adult literacy rate is a low 20 per cent – only 12.3 per cent for women. UNICEF requires US$120 million to fund its Sahel emergency response in 2012, of which only 32 per cent has been received to date. The European Union (EU) is one of the largest international donors to UNICEF nutrition programmes in the Sahel and in other regions. In Niger, working with the Government and other partners, UNICEF is currently assisting over 37,000 u
13 Avr 2016

KOLDA : LES FEMMES DE BAGADADJI ’’CONSCIENTES’’ DE L’UTILITÉ DES VISITES PRÉNATALES

Bagadadji, 11 avr (APS) Les femmes de la commune de Bagadadji prennent de plus en plus conscience de l’importance des…

Niger, November 2012. Haouaou Abdou, 52 years old, sits during the Key Family Practices demonstration with her youngest son Issiakou, 8 months, and Oumiera, 4 years, in the village of Mazadou Abdou.

By Jessica Mony

In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012.

Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel.

Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six months; proper hand-washing techniques; treatment of diarrhoea; knowledge of how to seek medical care; immunisation; using mosquito nets to prevent malaria; promotion of delayed pregnancies and girls education. The results of adhering to these practices for the children of Mazadou Abdou have been significant. Moutari Louali, a community volunteer who is helping to implement the programme explains the impact. “Before the programme started, around four to five ch
Niger, November 2012. Haouaou Abdou, 52 years old, sits during the Key Family Practices demonstration with her youngest son Issiakou, 8 months, and Oumiera, 4 years, in the village of Mazadou Abdou. By Jessica Mony In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012. Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel. Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six months; proper hand-washing techniques; treatment of diarrhoea; knowledge of how to seek medical care; immunisation; using mosquito nets to prevent malaria; promotion of delayed pregnancies and girls education. The results of adhering to these practices for the children of Mazadou Abdou have been significant. Moutari Louali, a community volunteer who is helping to implement the programme explains the impact. “Before the programme started, around four to five ch
03 Fév 2016

Pneumonie: “Plus de 490 000 enfants décédés en 2015”, l’Unicef invite à l’action

Le financement, la gestion et le traitement de la pneumonie "restent faibles en Afrique subsaharienne", a précisé le document qui…

Niger, November 2012. During the community health sessions, led by volunteer health workers called 'Natural Leaders' mums in the village of Mazadou Abdou take turns to demonstrate the 'Key Family Practices' that contribute to their children's health and in this village have literally saved lives.
Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months - the very best start for a child when safe and nutritious breast mild is all that a baby needs.
Demonstrated by mother Haouaou who has seen that her child born after the programme started is much stronger that the child born before.
Here Haouaou feeds 8 month old Issiakou with 4 year old daughter Oumiera watching.

By Jessica Mony

In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012.

Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel.

Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six mont
Niger, November 2012. During the community health sessions, led by volunteer health workers called 'Natural Leaders' mums in the village of Mazadou Abdou take turns to demonstrate the 'Key Family Practices' that contribute to their children's health and in this village have literally saved lives. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months - the very best start for a child when safe and nutritious breast mild is all that a baby needs. Demonstrated by mother Haouaou who has seen that her child born after the programme started is much stronger that the child born before. Here Haouaou feeds 8 month old Issiakou with 4 year old daughter Oumiera watching. By Jessica Mony In 2011, droughts across the Sahel plunged millions of families into a food crisis. A year after UNICEF and partners’ emergency response began, we ask ourselves how can we stop this vulnerability and persistent cycle of suffering? A poor, rural Nigerien village 600 people may hold the answer. Here, despite every family’s struggle during the drought, no child suffered malnutrition in 2012. Just three years ago it was rare for a week to go by without a child dying from combinations of malnutrition, diarrhoea and malaria in Mazadou Abdou village. During the frequent droughts, at times this would rise to two or three. No family was spared the pain of loss and mourning. Haouoau and Loli Abdou are just one set of parents that faced this tragedy. Loli holds up three fingers and lists that in 2000, 2002 and then again in 2004 they lost three children to malaria. Looking solemnly at their healthy 8 month baby boy Issiakou, it is clear the scars will likely never heal for this family. Sadly, their situation is not unique in this or any other village across the Sahel. Fortunately, in 2008 a simple UNICEF programme of family practices helped change all of this. The practices are simple and include exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life; complementary feeding for children after six mont
29 Jan 2016

Improving breastfeeding practices could save the lives of over 820 000 children a year

Series from The Lancet provides more evidence that breastfeeding is lifesaving – UNICEF Reductions in child mortality and reduced breast…

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